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Religion News Report

August 7, 2000 (Vol. 4, Issue 240)

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=== Falun Gong
1. Falungong launches ad campaign in Singapore, claiming harassment

=== Aum Shinrikyo
2. In Japan, executions marked by secrecy and perhaps incompetence

=== Scientology
3. Websites say sucks to big business
4. FDA: Risks may lurk behind mask

=== Universal Church of the Kingdom of God
5. Dodi's dad does a deal with 'exorcism' church
6. Holy-roller church cashes in on faithful
7. Ex-member bids farewell to 60G - and her faith

=== Islam
8. Religious tolerance toward Muslims
8a. Russia plans ban on fundamentalist group

=== Mormonism
9. BYU's Loss, U.'s Gain? S.L. School Hands Invitation to 'Real World' Star

=== Jehovah's Witnesses
10. Preaching ''the good news'' - door to door to door.

=== Witchcraft
11. Teenage Witches

=== Occult / Satanism
12. A Magick Life A Biography Of Aleister Crowley

=== Hate Groups / Hate Crimes
13. Idaho officials push case against agent in Ruby Ridge shooting
14. CD sales will benefit Aryan Nations
15. Racist mailing rips Jews
16. Court upholds dismissal of Hale's suit
17. True Believers; Hot Rocks; Breach of Faith (Matt Hale)

=== Other News
18. Ulster cops face new cult quiz (Opus Dei)
19. Two Poly Students Killed in Cult Clash
20. Religious colony, landowner face fines in irrigation dispute
21. Intimidation of the Waldorf kind
22. Ancient religion, latest technology (Jainism)
23. True Believers; Hot Rocks; Breach of Faith (Greater Ministries)
24. Court Frees Sat-Guru Maharajji

=== Noted
25. Cultural, spiritual foundations eroded
26. Pioneers, Researchers, Educators and Visionaries Join Forces
in Groundbreaking Online Source for Important Psychological Information


=== Falun Gong

1. Falungong launches ad campaign in Singapore, claiming harassment
AFP, Aug. 7, 2000
http://asia.dailynews.yahoo.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
The Falungong spiritual movement launched a promotional campaign in Singapore Monday, claiming members were being harassed by authorities although the group is legally registered.

Falungong, banned in China as a subversive organization, booked half-page newspaper advertisements which gave an introduction to the movement and its principles of ''truthfulness, compassion and forbearance.''

''We want to advertise because we want to let the public know about our group and what is happening in China,'' said spokesman Hao Gao.

The advertisement stressed that Falungong has been legally registered in Singapore as the Falun Buddha Society since last year. It also contained a hotline and details of their websites.

''Even if we are registered in Singapore, some policemen still approach our members who gather and tell them they are banned,'' he told AFP.
(...)

''The media in Singapore is still calling us a cult ... We are not a cult, we are a spiritual movement,'' he said.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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* About Falun Gong
http://www.apologeticsindex.org/f02.htmlOff-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]


=== Aum Shinrikyo

2. In Japan, executions marked by secrecy and perhaps incompetence
Chicago Tribune, Aug. 4, 2000
http://chicagotribune.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
TOKYO -- In the Land of the Rising Sun, Death Row inmates wake up every morning not knowing if they will see the sun go down.

Once their appeals are exhausted, the condemned can be executed without prior notice at any time. The cruel wait for the apparently often unskilled hangman can last 20 years or just a few months, depending on Justice Ministry officials.

Worse, a leading criminal lawyer alleges that, after botching hangings, executioners have used strangleholds to choke prisoners to death.

Japan's controversial capital punishment and execution system moved into the spotlight again in recent days when a judge sentenced to death a fifth member of the Aum Shinri Kyo doomsday cult, Kiyo Hayakawa.

The date or the place of Hayakawa's hanging, like those of the other 54 inmates on Death Row, will remain unknown to him, his family or his lawyers.
(...)

Many public figures in Japan have complained about unnecessary cruelty in the way 584 prisoners condemned to death since 1945 were treated and executed.

Author Kimiko Otsuka has detailed the rigid prison life of one condemned man, Toshihiko Hasegawa, who has waited eight years for the hangman.

Otsuka writes that monotonous prison life begins at 7 a.m. and includes periods of labor, exercise and meals that must be finished in 10 to 15 minutes. The condemned must sit still at designated spots in their solitary cells, are forbidden to speak to other inmates when they meet in the corridor and are punished if they look at the warden.

The author said she was amazed to find that Death Row inmates in the U.S. are allowed to smoke, make telephone calls and correspond with people on the outside.

In a 1998 report the human-rights organization Amnesty International reported that prisoners in Japan sometimes are not even allowed to wipe sweat off their brows without permission.

As punishment, they must sit in fixed positions for hours. Some are confined to ''protection cells'' where they are restrained with belts and handcuffs.

''The government is treating prisoners like animals,'' the report said.
(...)

''There are 136 members in the [480-member parliament] who oppose capital punishment. But those with the government party will not overtly say so because they would be considered anti-government,'' said Nobuaki Futami, a former legislator and president of a parliamentary committee to abolish capital punishment.
(...)

In preparation for the trials that can result in death sentences, Yasuda said, defense lawyers are not allowed to visit the crime scene, interview key witnesses or carry out their own investigations. Police and prosecutors can omit key evidence that could exonerate defendants if they feel it is detrimental to their case, he added.
(...)

Yasuda, who has become a leader in the movement for the abolition of capital punishment, was arrested in December 1998 on charges of legal misconduct. The charges have since simply evaporated. He was kept in prison for 10 months, mostly in solitary confinement, and refused bail twice.

At the time of his arrest Yasuda was the main defense counsel for members of the Aum Shinri Kyo cult lead by Shoko Asahara. He and 26 cult members are accused of multiple murder as well as the sarin gas attack on Tokyo's subway in 1995 in which 12 people died and 5,500 were poisoned.

Yasuda says he became the target of official wrath when he promised to provide evidence that would prove police were negligent in their investigation of the group and that authorities blundered in 1989 when they granted Asahara and Aum official religious status. The status offers tax breaks and de facto immunity from prosecution.

Under Japan's Religious Corporation Law, once a group is so recognized, authorities are not permitted to investigate its ''religious activities or doctrine.''

The sect's crime spree seems to have reinforced public support for capital punishment and made things tougher for opponents of the death penalty.

''People in Japan still believe if someone kills, he or she should be killed in return. The public does not consider this as punishment, but as justified payback,'' Yasuda said.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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=== Scientology

3. Websites say sucks to big business
The Guardian (England), Aug. 7, 2000
http://www.guardianunlimited.co.uk/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
The right to set up a really rude website aimed at undermining the public image of big businesses and religions is being fought for by civil rights activists in the US.

The battle comes in the wake of action by leading multinational companies like Wal-Mart and McDonald's to stem the growth of websites which add ''sucks'', ''kills'' or ''stinks'' to the brand name.

''This has become a constant issue,'' Barry Steinhart of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said in New York yesterday. ''The big trademark holders are trying to gobble up all the names.''

What has angered companies is the proliferation of sites that provide damaging and cheeky information about particular multinationals and churches and use the trade name of the chosen target somewhere in the title of the website.

This means that the idle surfer interested in a company or church can view scurrilous information on the internet.
(...)

Some companies have taken pre-emptive strikes. Volvo owns Volvo.sucks.com and Chase Manhattan has Chase.stinks.com.

Mr Steinhart said the right to free speech should include the right to set up websites which might offend.

While it is mainly big companies that seek to save themselves from embarrassment by buying up potentially rude sites, the Church of Scientology has also been unhappy about the use of its name in derogatory sites.

The ACLU is anxious to fight on behalf of the threatened sites so that they can create a new American adage: always giving a sucks an even break.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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4. FDA: Risks may lurk behind mask
St. Petersburg Times, Aug. 6, 2000
http://www.sptimes.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
With dazzling promises of a younger-looking face, Clearwater inventor George E. Springer introduced a battery-powered face mask to the world five years ago.

He gave it a fancy, European sounding name, ''Rejuvenique,'' and registered it with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office.

At salons and trade shows in Tampa Bay and around the country, Springer peddled the Rejuvenique Ultimate Facial Toning System to middle-aged men and women searching for the fountain of youth.

Before long, the face mask hit the big time.
(...)

But now, federal regulators are raising serious concerns about Rejuvenique, saying Salton and Springer have never scientifically documented that it works.

Because it is a medical device intended to affect the structure or function of the body, Rejuvenique ''is not safe except under the supervision of a practitioner licensed by state law,'' the Food and Drug Administration wrote in a July 12 warning letter to the company.

But that's not how the mask is being sold and used. It's available to anyone online and in stores.

Without FDA approval, ''marketing the Rejuvenique is a violation of the law,'' the letter to Salton and Springer's Clearwater offices says.

''Without FDA clearance there's no assurance it's safe or effective,'' said FDA spokeswoman Sharon Snider. ''A warning letter is a very serious thing.''

Snider said Rejuvenique officials responded to the letter within the required 15 days, but she would not say what was said. She also declined to say whether the company could legally continue to sell the product. ''I cannot categorically tell you they have violated the law,'' she said.

The FDA has the authority to seize the company's inventory, seek a court injunction to stop sales or assess civil penalties of up to $15,000 per violation. In its letter, the FDA says a violation occurs ''each and every time Salton Inc. ships a device.''
(...)

In fact, Rejuvenique could be doing more harm than good, said New York dermatologist Dr. Debra Jaliman, a clinical instructor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine and a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Dermatology.

''The FDA should pull it off the market until he substantiates his claim,'' said Jaliman, who is familiar with the mask.
(...)

Rejuvenique claims that 26 contact points inside the mask exercise the facial muscles, toning and firming the skin. According to the Rejuvenique Web site, the mask ''sends an invigorating yet relaxing microimpulse to the facial contact points. . . . These microimpulses will feel like a tapping or tingling sensation.''

In a 1999 news release, the company claims that it has conducted clinical trials that show 80 percent of participants experienced a reduction in the appearance of lines ''and a more radiant complexion.''

''We already know the benefits of exercise for the rest of the body. The Rejuvenique System provides those same benefits for our face,'' Springer is quoted as saying in the release.

The problem is, Jaliman said, that principle is not grounded in science. Facial muscles are not like the muscles in your arms and legs.
(...)

Rejuvenique, she continued, ''goes against everything we know as dermatologists. You do not want to stimulate muscles in the face. . . . Don't buy it. Don't use it unless you want wrinkles.''

Jaliman said a medical doctor would know that.

But 49-year-old inventor George Elmer Springer is often quoted as Dr. George Springer. The Times and other publications such as the Chicago Tribune have referred to Springer as a chiropractor, a practice that requires a medical license in Florida.

In a 1999 Rejuvenique infomercial, Springer identifies himself as ''a past associate professor of dermatology who's also been practicing holistic medicine for the past 19 years,'' according to Ridiculous Infomercial Review, an online reviewer of infomercials.

But Florida Department of Health officials say there is no George E. Springer licensed to practice medicine here.

''We don't have a Springer by any name that's a chiropractor in the state of Florida,'' said Health Department spokesman Bill Parizek. ''There is no George Elmer Springer licensed as any type of health professional in the state of Florida.''

It is unclear whether he became a doctor in another state. He told the Times in 1995 that he moved to Clearwater from Colorado in 1992.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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About Mr. Springer in his own words, quoted from his Scientology
cookie-cutter site
(part of Scientology's spamming project):

''Hello, my name is Dr. George Springer, and here is a little bit about
myself: I am a physician for 15 years turned inventor and entrepreneur. I
have been in Scientology since 1986 and with this cleverness grew and my
inventions is reach around the world.''

- http://www.our-home.org/drgeorgespringer/myself.htmOff-site Link


=== Universal Church of the Kingdom of God

5. Dodi's dad does a deal with 'exorcism' church
New York Post, Aug. 6, 2000
http://www.nypost.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
Dodi Fayed's wealthy father has helped a controversial international Pentecostal church gain a foothold in London - to the alarm of British authorities.

Mohamed Al-Fayed, owner of the famed Harrods department store, has sold his radio station, Liberty Radio, to the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God for an undisclosed sum.

The church has been criticized in New York and abroad for allegedly using high-pressure tactics to collect an estimated $1 billion a year from its worshippers.

''Already, two senior staff members at the station have gone [quit], because they're dismayed about being taken over by a cult,'' said Jeevan Vasagar, who covered the sale for London's Guardian newspaper.
(...)

In an investigative report published last month, The Post revealed that Universal Church preachers at branches in four boroughs here told worshippers that God would bless them - and their ''demons'' would be exorcised - but only if they made hefty donations.

Radio is how the sect's Brazilian founder got his start.

Edir Macedo Bezerra, who now lives in Purchase in Westchester County, launched his empire back in 1977 by preaching on a weekly religious show.

Bezerra and his converts were so persuasive, the church has been able to expand to more than 2,000 branches in nearly 50 countries, according to Brazilian press accounts.
(...)

The church owns no radio stations in the United States, but does air advertising programs, some of them on Spanish-language radio and television stations in New York.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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6. Holy-roller church cashes in on faithful
New York Post, July 23, 2000
http://208.248.87.252/07232000/33563.htmOff-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
Give us your money and we'll free your soul from Satan.

That's the marketing pitch of a controversial international Pentecostal church that is spreading like wildfire in New York and across the United States - and making its South American founder a multimillionaire.

Despite repeated and ongoing - but unsuccessful - investigations into alleged quackery and tax evasion in its native Brazil, the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God now has an estimated 6 million members worldwide and earns an estimated $1 billion annually from donations to its 2,000 churches in almost 50 countries.

The church, which offers members weekly walk-in exorcisms, has moved into nearly 100 converted movie theaters, supermarkets and storefronts in poor neighborhoods from Los Angeles to Long Island.
(...)

Believers are promised healing and riches - for a price. The more one gives, the more miracles one will reap, The Post heard preachers say in church branches in four boroughs.

''Give $500, $100, $50,'' a Brooklyn bishop pleaded recently in a branch in a converted movie house on Fourth Avenue in the Boerum Hill section of Brooklyn. ''When you give freely, you will prosper.''

In Woodside, Queens, a pastor bellows out to his followers: ''Unless you give, you cannot be blessed.''

Regina Cerveira, the Universal Church's chancellor and spiritual administrator in New York, insists that a higher donation doesn't buy a better blessing.

''A person who gives $500 is not going to get more blessings than someone who just gives $100.''

But ex-pastor Mario Justino said that during a decade of preaching for the Universal Church in Brazil, Portugal and Brooklyn, his superiors instructed him to ''tell the people, 'If you don't give, God does not look at your problems.'''

Justino said he told followers that God was not content with small change. If they want to prosper, they must give until it hurts.
(...)

''It's a spiritual version of Wall Street - give up some of your money in hopes of getting a lot more back,'' Iowa State University religion professor and former faith healer Hector Avalos said of Pentecostalism, the Christian belief system at the core of the Universal Church.

Adds Justino - who was kicked out of the church when he tested positive for the AIDS virus, ''It's not about the Bible. It's about the money.''

Daily church services often turn into theatrical dramas in which members are told they are possessed by demons that only the church can expel.
(...)

Testimonials of unexpected windfalls of cash, cars, homes - or long-awaited jobs are then given. Followers testify they have been cured of depression, insomnia, panic attacks, bad luck and even AIDS.
(...)

The church's spiritual leader, Edir Macedo Bezerra, is a former low-level Brazilian national lottery employee and disillusioned Catholic who began his ministry in 1977 by preaching on a weekly radio show, according to Brazilian press reports.

Macedo and his hierarchy of church leaders are under investigation in Brazil for allegedly falsifying documents and evading taxes on almost $5 million worth of electronic equipment for his 30 radio stations.

''It's frustrating,'' said national prosecutor Andre Libonati, who said he has been waiting three years for Macedo's lawyers to answer the charges in court.

''It is very difficult to get these cases moving in Brazil. I only hope U.S. authorities will begin their own investigation,'' said Libonati, who is based in Sao Paulo.

In Texas, where ex-members of a Houston temple raised questions about the church's fund-raising tactics, the state attorney's office said it found itself powerless to act because church members make their donations voluntarily.
(...)

Ex-church volunteer Ludy Karr of Houston admitted she scammed followers by buying olive oil from the local supermarket that pastors then claimed to churchgoers was blessed, and had come from Israel.

''When I asked the pastor about it, he said I had the devil inside me and that I was being taken over by evil spirits,'' said Karr.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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7. Ex-member bids farewell to 60G - and her faith
New York Post, July 23, 2000
http://208.248.87.252/07232000/33562.htmOff-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
Texas housewife Victoria Lorenzo has two words of warning for the thousands of New York members of the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God:

''Wake up!''
(...)

Lorenzo said the church soaked her family for $60,000 in donations in only three years.
(...)

Lorenzo filed a complaint with the Texas attorney general's office against a Houston branch of the church.
(...)

Texas officials say their hands are tied in pressing charges against the church.

''There's a problem here, but we cannot legally sue,'' said Heather Browne, spokeswoman for the Texas state attorney.

She said investigators found that church members gave their money voluntarily; no laws were broken. The probe died earlier this year.

Here in New York, the state attorney general's office, which has the authority to investigate claims of church fraud, said it has received no complaints against Universal Church.

The few local churchgoers who would speak to The Post said they gave their money willingly.
(...)

Hector Avalos - a former Pentecostal faith healer who has a doctorate in divinity from Harvard University and teaches religion at Iowa State University - said he sees serious ''warning signs'' in the practices of the Universal Church.

He said worshippers of any faith should be on guard when:

* Their church uses threats or promises to get donations.

Universal Church pastors often tell members that if they don't give money, they will not receive God's blessings.

* The minister is wealthy.

The Universal Church's spiritual leader, Edir Macedo Bezerra, has three BMWs - one in his wife's name - and a Mercedes registered to his name.

* The church does no charitable work.

Universal Church officials say they cannot afford to do any charitable outreach in New York, but hope to in the future.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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=== Islam

8. Religious tolerance toward Muslims
Arabia.com/AROL, Aug. 6, 2000
http://www.akhbar.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
WASHINGTON (AROL) - Last week the Senate passed a bill that supports religious tolerance toward Muslims, recognizing the significant contributions of America's six million American Muslims.
(...)

The bill condemns anti-Muslim intolerance and discrimination, and sets out to uphold a level of political discourse that does not scapegoat the Islamic faith and its adherents or draw political conclusions from religious doctrine.

The bill recognizes American Muslims as ''followers of one of the three major monotheistic religions of the world and one of the fastest growing faiths in the United States,'' information that may be new for an American public largely uneducated about the Islamic faith.
(...)

First introduced on July 1st, 1999 by the resolution's chief sponsor Senator Spencer Abraham (R-MI), the bill is co-sponsored by Larry E. Craig (R-ID), Tim Johnson (D-SD), Charles Robb (D-VA), Russell Feingold (D-WI), Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) and Paul Wellstone (D-MN). Senate Resolution 133 was passed unanimously, without amendment.
(...)

The bill acknowledges that American Muslims have been stereotyped and discriminated against because of their faith. It also states that American Muslims have been harassed and have been victims of hate-inspired violence, citing the aftermath of the Oklahoma City bombing when American Muslims were initially blamed for the disaster.
(...)

The bill also acknowledges that American Muslims have been portrayed negatively in policy issues addressing religious persecution abroad and in discussions related to combating domestic terrorism. It also points out that anti-Muslim rhetoric and stereotyping have contributed to hostility against Muslims in neighborhoods throughout the US Forty-two-year-old Ayesha, a Pakistani-American, says it is about time a bill like this was passed.
(...)

The Arab American Institute (AAI) has been instrumental in ensuring passage of the bill since 1999, when the bill was first introduced in Congress.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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8a. Russia plans ban on fundamentalist group
The Hindu (India), Aug. 5, 2000
http://www.indiaserver.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
MOSCOW, AUG 5. Russian authorities are pressing for a ban on a fundamentalist Islamic sect in an attempt to halt the onslaught of religious fanaticism in mainly-Muslim regions of the country. The advisory Security Council has called for outlawing Wahhabism, a conservative brand of Sunni Islam that has recently gained a foothold in the former Soviet Central Asia and is spreading rapidly across Russia.

According to the Interior Minister, Gen. Vladimir Rushailo, up to 80 Wahhabi organisations are currently active in Russia. They first cropped up in North Caucasus, where the Russian army has been fighting Islamic separatists in Chechnya, and spread north, not only to Muslim regions, such as Tatarstan, but to non-Muslim territories - Astrakhan, Volgograd, Kuban and Mordovia.

Moscow maintains that Wahhabi mercenaries of Arab origin and their local followers are spearheading the rebel resistance in Chechnya.
(...)

The issue has split Russian Muslims. Three months ago Sheikh Talgat Tadjutdin, head of the Spiritual Board of Russian Muslims, called on Russian authorities to ban Wahhabism. In a letter to the Russian President, he said his organisation needed government support to stem the tide of aggressive Wahhabism, which is generously financed from abroad and skillfully exploits Russia's economic problems and religious illiteracy of Russian Muslims.

The leader of a rival Muslim organisation, Russia's Council of Mufti, Sheigh Ravil Gainutdinov, has opposed a formal ban on Wahhabism. While admitting that extremist Islamic sects were gaining a foothold in Russia, he argued that such a ban would inevitably lead to abuses that would hit mainstream Muslims.
(...)

However, the Kremlin is determined to press ahead with a legislative ban on Wahhabism. With Moscow's tacit approval, Dagestan last year approved a law outlawing ``Wahhabi and other extremist activities'' on its territory. The new pro-Russian administrator of Chechnya, Mufti Akhmad Kadyrov, has also banned the Wahhabi movement.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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=== Mormonism

9. BYU's Loss, U.'s Gain? S.L. School Hands Invitation to 'Real World' Star
The Salt Lake Tribune, Aug. 5, 2000
http://beta.yellowbrix.com//a>Off-site Link
[Story no longer online?
Read this]
Brigham Young University may not want her, but the University of Utah is rolling out the welcome mat for Julie Stoffer, the BYU student who was suspended after appearing on MTV's ''Real World.''

BYU booted the 21-year-old business major from Delafield, Wis., for breaking the university's honor code. The LDS Church-owned university prohibits, among other things, single students living with members of the opposite sex.

Stoffer lived with four men and two women in New Orleans during the show's filming, which began in January and lasted five months. Stoffer and her parents, Jan and Jim Stoffer, learned of her suspension from BYU on July 28.
(...)

''The U. will be a good environment for [Stoffer],'' said Esplin. Most of the university's students are Mormon. There is a Mormon organization (Latter-day Saint Student Association) on campus and the nearby Salt Lake University LDS Institute offers courses in Mormon theology. Opportunities for students heavily involved in the church are plentiful, Esplin said.

Though complaints about an anti-Mormon sentiment on campus often circulate among students and faculty at the U., student Erika Thew says her school ''would be a great choice'' for Stoffer. The junior is editor-in-chief of The Century, the U.'s first student publication representing LDS Church members on campus. Thew, who is an LSSA officer, says, ''The institute program is strong and the students are excited to be there and involved.''
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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=== Jehovah's Witnesses

10. Preaching ''the good news'' - door to door to door.
The Philadephia Inquirer, Aug. 4, 2000
http://web.philly.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
(...) There are about one million Witnesses in the United States, and each one healthy and old enough to knock on doors is expected to ''preach the good news'' a few times a week.
(...)

Witnesses average 740 random calls for each convert.
(...)

The Witnesses began in the 1870s when Curtis T. Russell, a young Pittsburgh Presbyterian disturbed by the thought that a loving God would create hell, started his own reading of Scripture.

Based on several biblical and extra-biblical calculations - including measurements of the Great Pyramid - Russell concluded that Christ had returned to Earth in 1874 in nonbodily form.

Russell also declared that in 1914 - a number found in Revelation 14:1 - Jehovah would overthrow man's rule on Earth and call 144,000 chosen humans to share paradise with Him.

What separates Russell's teachings from mainstream Christianity is his conclusion that Jehovah, the God of the Bible, is not a trinity. Jesus is Jehovah's unique son and messenger, Russell said, but not divine, and the Holy Spirit is not a person but Jehovah's ''active force.''

Russell also taught that humans have no eternal soul and that there is no hell. All bodies will be resurrected at Armageddon, he said, but Jehovah will simply annihilate those He does not call to paradise.

Calling themselves the Dawn Bible Students' Society, Russell and several companions began to preach and, in 1879, began publishing a pamphlet called Zion's Watch Tower, the precursor of the Watchtower magazine. The organization moved its headquarters to Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1909.

In 1914, Russell reset the date for Armageddon to 1915. Later, he said it would come in 1918. After he died in 1916, his successor, Joseph Rutherford, declared that Christ's reign had indeed begun in 1914 but was not yet visibly manifest.

In 1923, Rutherford and the Governing Body in Brooklyn expanded their understanding of who would be saved to include the millions who abide by Jehovah's teachings, as understood by the Witnesses: that after Armageddon, they will live in God's peaceful kingdom, ruled over by Jehovah, Jesus and the 144,000.

The denomination changed its name to Jehovah's Witness in 1931 and no longer predicts a date for Armageddon, saying only that these are ''the last days.''
(...)

Because the Witnesses so vigorously assert that they alone will be saved, socialize mostly among themselves, and expel and shun members who consistently violate church teachings, the group has been described as a cult.

''They tell you how to dress, how to walk, who you talk to, what you can read,'' said Randy Watters, 48, of Los Angeles, a former congregational elder and former employee of the Watchtower publishing house in Brooklyn. ''They make you report violations by any other Witness. And they can be very abusive of anyone who challenges them.''

Watters, who lives in Los Angeles, sells out-of-print Witness publications and maintains a Web site (www.freeminds.org) critical of the denomination. The Witness' Web site is www.watchtower.orgOff-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]

But that intense involvement and commitment - and the confidence in eternal life that membership offers - are just what make Bob Shaughnessy so grateful that he answered that knock on his door 20 years ago.

''It filled my whole life,'' he says.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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Note: ''Curtis'' should be ''Charles''

The organization of Jehovah's Witnesses is a cult, both theologically and
sociologically. Theologically it is a cult of Christianity.


=== Witchcraft

11. Teenage Witches
Fox News/The Times (England), Aug. 6, 2000
http://www.foxnews.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
LONDON - Teenage girls are showing unprecedented interest in witchcraft, with about 100 every month wanting to join covens to learn about casting spells, according to a report in the September issue of YouthworkOff-site Link, a monthly magazine of the Premier Christian Media Group.

Boys, too, are rejecting Christianity and the Church for witchcraft, inspired by television programs such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Sabrina the Teenage Witch and the Harry Potter books.

However, the greatest demand is from young women seeking female empowerment. The demand is being accelerated by thousands of pages on the Internet offering anything from ''poison'' rings to spells.

The report says that the development is influenced by pressure to pass exams, to find boyfriends and to become wealthy.

One book to be published later this year, The Young Witches' Handbook, by Kate West, vice-president of the Pagan Federation, includes spells to get a partner and pass exams.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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=== Occult / Satanism

12. A Magick Life - A Biography Of Aleister Crowley
Mail on Sunday (England), Aug. 6, 2000
http://beta.yellowbrix.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
Between the two world wars, before the rise of Hitler or a proper knowledge of what Lenin and Stalin were up to in Russia, the most popular choice of the purest embodiment of evil would have been an Englishman, Aleister Crowley.
(...)

Today the only people likely to regard Crowley as evil incarnate are the fundamentalist Christians he so despised. Only they believe in the devil, whom Crowley purported to serve. To other people, Crowley is likely to come across as merely an eccentric and at times a buffoon.
(...)

In fact, Crowley came from a long line of Croydon brewers. Both his parents were members of a fundamentalist Protestant sect, the Plymouth Brethren. The Bible was the only book Crowley was permitted to read as a child. From the age of eight he was sent to strict Evangelical boarding schools where he was bullied and beaten at his second school by 'a sexually ambiguous sadomasochist' headmaster.

In time, the young Crowley rebelled against the bigoted atmosphere in his home. His mother began to call him 'the beast' and came to believe that her son was in fact 'the Beast of the Apocalypse, the Antichrist of the Book of Revelation'. It was an identity that the young Crowley happily accepted and it set the course for the rest of his life. He did not simply lose his Christian faith; he changed sides.
(...)

In this new biography of Crowley, Martin Booth does not shy away from the grim details of Crowley's depraved sex life, both heterosexual and homosexual.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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=== Hate Groups / Hate Crimes

13. Idaho officials push case against agent in Ruby Ridge shooting
Seattle Times, July 27, 2000
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
SPOKANE - Officials in Idaho's Boundary County are not giving up their efforts to prosecute FBI sharpshooter Lon Horiuchi for a shooting during the standoff at Ruby Ridge.

The northern Idaho county has petitioned the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for a rehearing on the issue, contending Horiuchi's slaying of Vicki Weaver was unconstitutional.

A three-judge panel of the appeals court ruled in June that Horiuchi couldn't be charged by the county in her death. The county wants the full court to hear its case.

During a 1992 standoff between federal agents and white supremacist Randy Weaver at Weaver's remote cabin, Horiuchi fired a single shot that killed Weaver's wife, Vicki, and wounded family friend Kevin Harris.

He fired as Vicki Weaver held open the cabin door, her 10-month-old baby in her arms, to let Randy Weaver, their daughter Sara and Harris back inside.

The 9th Circuit's 2-1 decision included a sharply worded dissent from Judge Alex Kozinski, who wrote that the ruling ''throws a monkey wrench into our law governing the proper use of deadly force.''

In the petition for a rehearing, the county contends it could have charged Horiuchi with second-degree murder instead of manslaughter.
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14. CD sales will benefit Aryan Nations
Spokane.net, Aug. 4, 2000
http://www.spokane.net/=
Six major distributors of skinhead music are donating proceeds from sales of their compact discs to the Aryan Nations legal defense fund.

The entire $15 purchase price for such CDs as ''Murder Squad,'' ''Holocaust 2000,'' ''Too White for You'' and ''Bullet to the Head'' will go to the Aryan Nations legal fund during the month of August.

Skinhead music is laced with anti-Semitic, racist and homophobic phrases. It's become the leading recruitment tool for white supremacists.

''This is a perfect opportunity to expand your music collection and help donate to a well-needed cause,'' white supremacist August Kreis III said of the monthlong CD sale to benefit the Aryan Nations.

The white supremacy sect is being sued for civil damages by a woman and her son whose car was chased and hit by bullets fired by three Aryan security guards in 1998.

The suit, being brought by the Southern Poverty Law Center, is scheduled for trial Aug. 28 in Coeur d'Alene.
(...)

The CD sales campaign for the Aryan's legal war chest was announced this week on white supremacy Internet sites. Those include sites of the Posse Comitatus and Vinland Records, which markets neo-Nazi, skinhead music CDs.
(...)

Distributors involved in the fund-raiser include Panzerfaust, Tri-State Terror, Imperium, Thule Publications, Resistance Records and Vinland.

Resistance Records is owned by the National Alliance and its founder, William Pierce, of Hillsboro, W.Va.

Pierce wrote ''The Turner Diaries,'' which inspired a 1980s terrorist group known as The Order and Timothy McVeigh, who bombed the federal building in Oklahoma City in 1995.

''Pierce has quietly turned himself into racist rock's leading impresario, selling, he says, roughly $1 million in merchandise a year,'' The Washington Post reported in January.

Justin Massa, an expert on skinhead music groups, said the fund raising is further evidence of the ''inter-connectedness of the white supremacy movement.''

''It's a demonstration of how groups from around the nation will rally behind a cohort in trouble,'' said Massa, a research analyst with the Center for New Community in Chicago.
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15. Racist mailing rips Jews
The Spokesman Review, Aug. 3, 2000
http://beta.yellowbrix.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
A racist evangelist has mass-mailed an anti-Jewish speech he delivered at the Aryan Nations compound to thousands of households in North Idaho.

''I believe this kind of speech targets Jews living in North Idaho for violence,'' said a member of the Jewish community, who asked not to be identified. Civil rights leaders agreed.

The 10-page reprinted speech calls on white racists to rally at the side of Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler in a civil damages suit set for trial Aug. 28 in Coeur d'Alene.

The anti-Semitic speech was delivered July 15 at the Aryan Nations Congress by self-styled evangelist R. Vincent Bertollini, who was accompanied by Carl E. Story.

It was the first time Bertollini and Story have been seen attending the annual gathering of racists. Both appeared with Butler in 1999 at an Aryan Nations lecture at North Idaho College.

The two wealthy, retired business executives live in Sandpoint and head what they call the 11th Hour Remnant Messenger, which preaches white supremacy.

The mailing uses anti-Semitic terms to describe Morris Dees, co- founder of the Southern Poverty Law Center, which is bringing the suit against the Aryan Nations.
(...)

The 11th Hour Remnant Messenger was responsible for two mass- mailings in North Idaho in 1998 that also were controversial and prompted citizen reaction.

One of the earlier mass-mailings was a videotape of Butler, taken at his Aryan church headquarters near Hayden Lake.

The other was a large poster tracing Cain and Abel's descendants in the Bible in an attempt to justify racist beliefs tied to a religion known as Christian Identity. The full-color posters on glossy paper were printed, commercially folded and mailed at an estimated cost of $10 apiece.

The 11th Hour Remnant Messenger preaches that white people are the true children of God, while Jews are impostors and offspring of the devil.

The religious teachings are similar to the Christian Identity message promoted by Butler and his Aryan Nations.
(...)

The mailing likely will be discussed at Monday's meeting of the Kootenai County Task Force on Human Rights, Stewart said.
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16. Court upholds dismissal of Hale's suit -- White supremacist claims ISU unfairly denied right to speak
Peoria Journal Star, July 29, 2000
http://beta.yellowbrix.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
An Illinois appellate court has upheld a McLean County judge's dismissal of a lawsuit filed by white supremacist Matt Hale, who claimed that Illinois State University unfairly denied him the right to speak to a campus group.

The suit contended that an ISU student's e-mail to Hale constituted a contract inviting him to speak at a lecture series in February 1999. Hale said the contract was broken when the student withdrew the invitation, saying, ''Your philosophy and goals for your speech regarding the white supremacy movement are incompatible'' with the lecture series.

In a ruling filed Wednesday, the 4th District Appellate Court said the parties never reached agreement on the topic and content of the speech, ''and therefore no contract was formed.''

Hale's lawsuit named three parties as defendants: ISU, Global Review Student Association President Anna Panocha, who wrote the e- mails to Hale, and Global Review adviser Marilyn Boyd.
(...)

Hale, an East Peorian who turned 29 on Thursday, said he was disappointed by the decision. He hasn't decided whether to appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court.

''No matter what, I have made it clear to ISU and other universities that they will not tread upon the liberties of white racists with impunity,'' said Hale, leader of the East Peoria-based World Church of the Creator. ''This gives me a great amount of satisfaction.''
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17. True Believers; Hot Rocks; Breach of Faith
CNN/TIME, Aug. 6, 2000 (Transcript)
http://www.cnn.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
(...)

Just a few years ago, hardly anyone had ever heard of the World Church of the Creator, let alone its 20-something leader, Matthew Hale. But that all changed last summer, when Benjamin Smith, one of Hale's followers, went on a three-day shooting spree through Illinois and Indiana. Before Smith took his own life in July 4th, his campaign of racial violence claimed two lives and injured nine others. It also gave Hale and his white supremacist group a national platform.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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=== Other News

18. Ulster cops face new cult quiz
Scottish Daily Record, Aug. 7, 2000
http://beta.yellowbrix.com/
Police officers in Ulster will be forced to admit if they are members of a secretive Catholic cult.

The Opus Dei group has been added to a list of organisations which RUC officers must give details of.

It also includes the Orange Order, the Apprentice Boys of Derry, the Freemasons and the RC Knights of St Columba.
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19. Two Poly Students Killed in Cult Clash
PostExpress (Nigeria)/ Africa News Service, Aug. 7, 2000
http://beta.yellowbrix.com/
[Nigerian campus cults]
Lagos - Two students of the Polytechnic, Ibadan, at the Eruwa Satellite Campus were shot dead over the weekend as rival secret cult groups - Black Axe and Eiye Confraternity clashed within the institution's campus.

An old woman passing by within the vicinity of the bloody clash also received serious injury from gunshot which pierced through her body.
(...)

Immediately after the news spread to town, the elders of the community as well as vigilante groups and students swung into action, mounting surveillance for the suspected cultists.

The surveillance exercise yielded fruitful results as no fewer than 17 suspects were nabbed as they were returning from their hideouts.
(...)

Dangerous weapons including guns, knives and axe were recovered from the suspects.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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20. Religious colony, landowner face fines in irrigation dispute
The Oregonian, Aug. 6, 2000
http://www.oregonlive.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
SPOKANE -- The state Department of Ecology has proposed fines totaling $40,200 against an Eastern Washington religious sect and a landowner for alleged irrigation violations.

The Stahl Hutterian Brethren is the second Eastern Washington Hutterite colony to face fines over the past two months.

In late June, the Ecology Department fined the Marlin Hutterian Brethren $34,300 for allegedly irrigating 125 acres of land west of Odessa for which the group has no water rights and for failing to install a required water-flow meter.

At the Marlin Hutterian Brethren's request, the Ecology Department is reconsidering that fine, said Jani Gilbert, an Ecology Department spokeswoman.
(...)

Hutterites are people of German heritage who practice a communal, Christian lifestyle in farming colonies.

The fines against the Stahl and Marlin colonies involve water in the Odessa sub-area, a region with severe water availability problems, the Ecology Department said. Water management in the area and two other sub-areas elsewhere in the state is managed closely because of declines in water tables.
(...)

''Because of these declines and because we've received a lot of complaints about unauthorized irrigation, (the Department of Ecology) has stepped up compliance efforts in this area.''
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21. Intimidation of the Waldorf kind
taz (Germany), Aug. 4, 2000
Translation: CISAR
http://cisar.org/000804b.htmOff-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
He who throws a stone into the water may at least expect some ripples. In its broadcasts of February 28 and July 10, 2000, ''Report'' politics magazine from Mainz (ARD) threw two stones - the result was a wave of lawsuits and a flood of protest.

The first broadcast was about very extensive anti-Semitic incidents at the Waldorf schools, the second was about racism in the book, ''Atlantis und das Raetsel der Eiszeitkunst'' - a little volume authored by Ernst Uehli, the first Waldorf teacher, which is on a list of literature which is put at the disposal of Waldorf teachers as preparation for history instruction - in the meantime the Waldorf schools have distanced themselves from the book after the Federal Families Ministry filed an application for classification.
(...)

The ''Report'' broadcast ended with the unusual comment, ''We will not let ourselves be intimidated.''

The nature of this ''intimidation'' was revealed by Fritz Frey, chief editor at ''Report'': ''After an earlier broadcast in February, the Alliance of Free Waldorf Schools flooded us with a number of lawsuits, demands for counter-presentations and demands to cease and desist. They used every means at their disposal to put their own interests into action, like several hundred faxes and letters to the editors.''

Now lawsuits and notes of protest are legitimate means of defense - but the content of many of these letters are not, as Eric Friedler reports. Letters and telephone calls which the editor of the controversial broadcast received allegedly certified that he was the ''reincarnated anti-Christ'' and that he belonged ''behind bars.'' Even the friendlier instructions sounded gruesome: ''If you go along with Steiner's ideology of repeated life on earth, then the souls of the Atlantans are still among us,'' said one, and another, ''As far as the Negroes, name one who has founded a university.'' The mother of one student was surprising with her fatal logic, ''We are not racists, that is all Jewish propaganda!'' Apart from the quality of many reactions, the quantity was also surprising. Frey sensed a concerted action behind the stereotypes and identical reactions, even down to word selection: ''There are indications that the schools sounded the cry to harass us.''

Actually, on the home page of the Alliance of Free Waldorf Schools (www.waldorf-schule.deOff-site Link) no protest is being called for, but the defeat in the legal dispute with ''Report's'' SWR is being sold as a victory.

Counter-presentations and demands to cease and desist were completely rejected by the Frankfurt State Court and Stuttgart Superior State court. Only the statement that Jewish parents ''increasingly'' took their children out of the school may not be repeated, as per temporary restraining order - SWR has filed appeal.

SWR may be well-provisioned for a cost intensive legal dispute. But not independent investigative journalists like the Austrian, Angelika Walser, who had published a critical article in the Christian conservative weekly paper ''Die Furche'': ''There was a storm of protest such as ''Die Furche'' had never before experienced. I was threatened with lawsuits and accused of having falsified much of my information.'' The affair was then ''amicably resolved,'' as they say so wonderfully in Austria: a preliminary hearing occurred with the Graz Waldorf school, as Walser reported, and her bosses. The journalist gave up the theme out of necessity: ''If you investigate them you need broad shoulders.''
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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22. Ancient religion, latest technology
San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 5, 2000
http://www.mercurycenter.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
(...) The inauguration of a wired, Internet-ready Jain temple, the first in North America, might seem to be an anomaly. For nearly 3,000 years, Jainism has espoused a pure pacifism, an intense ecological awareness and a strict vegetarian diet. Some Jain monks renounce the wearing of clothes -- an extension of their poverty vows -- and live at forest's edge or outside rural villages in India.

But Jainism has enjoyed a quiet ascendance in the West the past few years, and with that comes the influence of technology. There are 100,000 Jains in the United States and Canada. The Bay Area's 4,000 Jains include many high-tech engineers whose decision to carry Jainism into the digital age is ``very reflective of Indian culture,'' said Gujar, project manager for the new $7.4 million temple complex.
(...)

With roots that extend back to northern India in the ninth century B.C., Jainism remains in sync with modernity. Young Jains who follow vegan diets -- no meat, eggs, milk, or animal products -- are not only politically in vogue. They also are religiously responsible. They have reconnected to a lineage that influenced Gandhi through its precept of ahimsa, or non-violence, and that inspires present-day ecologists with a philosophy emphasizing the sanctity of all life forms. Maybe it's fitting that the new temple -- built in accordance with ancient, scriptural specifications -- is wired for the Web.

Thousands are attending the four-day inauguration of the Jain Bhawan center, as it is officially known. (``Bhawan'' is Hindi for community center or meeting hall). The ceremonies, which began Friday with colorful pujas and religious discourses, are being Webcast throughout the complex -- and around the world at www.tvofindia.comOff-site Link.

Why the Web? One goal is knitting together the international Jain (pronounced jane or jine) community.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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23. True Believers; Hot Rocks; Breach of Faith
CNN/TIME, Aug. 6, 2000
http://www.cnn.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
(...)
SHAW: The promise was simple: Give and you shall receive -- and receive. But those who gave to the Greater Ministries Church say all they got was taken. Now Greater Ministries' leaders face a myriad of charges, including fraud and money laundering. Their trial is scheduled to begin next month.

As Greater Ministries prepares to go to court, we want to take another look at Aram Roston's report on this alleged breach of faith.
[...more...]   [Need the full story? Read this]
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24. Court Frees Sat-Guru Maharajji
Vanguard Daily (Nigeria), July 26, 2000
http://www.allafrica.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
Spiritual leader of One Love Family, Sat-Guru Maharajji who has been facing trial since October last year for allegedly killing a Ghanaian national, one Nobert Afesi in his Iju Ashram on July 6, 1999 yesterday regained his freedom on the order of an Ikeja High Court judge, Justice James Oduneye.

The high court judge who discharged and acquitted him of one-count charge of murder slammed on him and eight of his devotees held that the prosecution failed woefully to establish its case of murder against all the accused persons. He also lashed out at the police saying their investigation fell below standard.
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=== Noted

25. Cultural, spiritual foundations eroded
Business Times, Aug. 7, 2000
http://beta.yellowbrix.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
The globalisation phenomenon has not only just created specific problems and increasing risk in the ''hard'' areas of the environment, crime, the economy, disease and terrorism. It has brought with it systematic erosion in the emotional, cultural and spiritual foundations of our lives as well.

Around the world today, we can see a visible decline in the sustaining values and an unmet need to believe in something greater than ourselves. A sense of isolation, a lack of a larger purpose, and a dissatisfaction with material life - whether affluent or impoverished - is causing millions of individuals to look afresh at the spiritual foundation of their lives. Solutions are less and less available through traditional channels and institutions. The rise of cults, fundamentalism (Christian, Jewish, Hindu and Islamic) and even of militant fundamentalism is the inevitable response to a lack of sustaining these values.
(...)

The lack of a sustainable social and religious institutional model is not confined to Western nations. Many of the same issues in some form or other are present in the East. The iron rice bowl continues to turn up empty in search of spiritual nourishment.

The rise in over 10,000 cults in China and the surprising power of the Falungong movement are only two of the many reflections of a lost set of moral bearings in this ancient and complex country.

The same sense of unment deeper need in China is driving a search for spirituality outside the secular state mechanisms and away from a limiting set of approved religious institutions.

Resurgence in old religious and spiritual traditions, from ancestor worship to village gods to feng shui geomancers, has not only spread across China, but even begun to make incursions into Western consciousness as well.
(...)

* The writer is the managing director of Bain & Company (Asia), Inc and author of ''World of Risk: Next Generation Strategy for a Volatile Era'' recently published by John Wiley and Sons.

This article is an extract from the book which Mr Daniell has graciously allowed Business Times to serialise.
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26. Pioneers, Researchers, Educators and Visionaries Join Forces in Groundbreaking Online Source for Important Psychological Information
Business Wire, Aug. 7, 2000 (Press Release)
http://beta.yellowbrix.com/Off-site Link
[Story no longer online? Read this]
In an unprecedented effort to bring proven, research-based psychology information to people and clinicians, an initial team of nine of the world's most renowned psychologists, researchers and educators today launched RealPsychology.com (www.realpsychology.comOff-site Link). The team of experts, all published leaders in their respective fields, includes Dr. Daryl J Bem, Professor of Psychology at Cornell University; Dr. Laura Carstensen, Professor and Vice Chair of the Psychology Department at Stanford University; Dr. Robert Cialdini, Regent Professor of Psychology at Arizona State University; Dr. Tom Gilovich, Professor of Psychology at Cornell University; Dr. Sabrina Lin, Co-founder and CEO; Dr. Christina Maslach, Professor of Psychology at the University of California at Berkeley; Dr. Lee Ross, Co-founder and Principal Scientist; Dr. Shelley Taylor, Professor of Psychology at the University of California at Los Angeles; and Dr. Philip Zimbardo, Co-founder and Principal Scientist.

''As longtime researchers and teachers, we feel that the findings of our field speak to many important challenges of everyday life. RealPsychology is an outlet for this type of information,'' said Dr. Zimbardo, RealPsychology principal scientist and Stanford University professor. ''Our goal is to provide continuous access to reliable research-based information on the whole range of issues addressed by our field.''
(...)

Dr. Philip Zimbardo, a Stanford University professor since 1968, is an internationally acclaimed psychological researcher, educator, writer, and media personality. Zimbardo is the author of more than 20 text and popular books, as well as hundreds of professional articles and chapters. He helped create and narrates the popular PBS-TV series, Discovering Psychology, shown regularly on public television and in classrooms throughout the United States and a dozen other countries. His broad expertise stretches across many domains from shyness to cults, violence, persuasion, hypnosis, time perspective, prisons, and teaching.

''While RealPsychology primarily addresses the challenges we all face as individuals trying to be more effective, and happier, in our everyday lives, we will also look to the problems and opportunities confronted by our larger society,'' said Dr. Lee Ross, RealPsychology co-founder. ''There is an increasingly useful body of evidence that speaks to effectiveness of various interventions designed to address problems in our communities and create more harmonious relations between nations. We hope that Real Psychology will make our users more sophisticated consumers not only of goods and services, but of ideas and proposed social policies as well.''

About RealPsychology.com
RealPsychology.com is an Internet portal for people who are interested in becoming more effective and successful in all aspects of their personal, social and business life. Formed by experts in their field, RealPsychology.com is a trusted source for consumer-oriented, yet scientific based research and services where users can participate online in dialogues and exchanges with real experts and with one another. Founded in July 2000, RealPsychology.com is privately held and headquartered in Palo Alto, CA. For more information, visit the company's Web site at www.realpsychology.com.
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